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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

THE BULLETI N 

of the 
Nort-h Carolina Department- of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
Number 167 March, 1962 



FOREWORD 

This thirteenth annual issue of the Tobacco Report 
has been compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and 
J. H. Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of 
Markets of the North Carolina Department of Agri- 
culture, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture under the Research and Marketing Act. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting 
Service of the North Carolina and United States De- 
partments of Agriculture, and the Tobacco Branch of 
the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service for much 
of the statistical data contained herein. 

This issue of the Tobacco Report is dedicated to the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture's Tobacco Inspection 
and Market News Service. The value of the unbiased 
information has enabled tobacco growers to market 
their crop on a basis of fair competition. 




Commissioner of Agriculture 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 
Markets Division, North. Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



3/62— 6M 

2 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

The Flue-Cured Outlook. 1962 _... _. 5 

The Burley Tobacco Outook, 1962 11 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops, 1919-1961 12 

North Carolina Burley Crops, 1928-1961 „ 13 

State Summary, 1961-62 14 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report, 1961-62 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehous Resales, 1961-62 18 

Prdoucer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco By States, 1961 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts— 1961 18 

Flue-Cured Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

Burley Movement In and Out of North Carolina 19 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments, 1962 20 

North Carolina Burley Tobacco Allotments, 1962 _ .22 

USDA's Tobacco Inspection Service —23 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

By Belts and Markets 26 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption By Kinds, 1961 Back Cover 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 



http://www.archive.org/details/northcarolinatob19611962 



Flue-Cured Outlook 1962 

The adoption by North Carolina flue-cured tobacco growers 
of new varieties of seed and cultural techniques are paying divi- 
dends on the auction sales floors. This was evident during the 
1961 sales season, when growers received over $530 million dol- 
lars for a crop raised on 462 thousand acres of land. 

During a short span of ten years, growers have increased 
yields per acre almost one-third. In 1952 it took 735,000 acres 
to produce the allotted poundage — today 462,000 acres accom- 
plish the same purpose. 

This year growers will have a large selection of disease resist- 
ant and old line non-resistant varieties to choose from, thanks 
to the Variety Evaluation Program conducted by North Carolina 
State College. This program is participated in by both public 
and private seed breeders. 

Before a new variety of seed is offered to the growers it must 
be declared to be correctly identified by the Tobacco Seed Com- 
mittee and recorded with the Department of Agriculture. This 
is a prerequisite to legal sale of tobacco seed in the state. The 
Committee's action does not constitute a recommendation of the 
varieties. Its sole function is variety identification to insure 
correct labeling of the seed. The Committee approved 38 varie- 
ties for recording in 1962, and several varieties have given out- 
standing results in yields per acre and quality in field tests. 

There have been important changes in recent years, both in 
improved cultural practices and in mechanization. In general 
farming, mechanization and efficiency have increased at a rapid 
rate and this certainly applies also to tobacco farming. 

However, even with present improvement, much of our flue- 
cured tobacco is still produced in the old-fashioned way. How- 
ever, at agricultural colleges and on some individual farms, ex- 
periments are being conducted that could ultimately change 
tobacco production extensively in the future,. The use of bulk 
curers began to spread over the flue-cured area during 1961, and 
between thirty and forty were used successfully. 

Experiments with mechanical harvesters in field use have 
advanced to the place that a few may be used in connection with 
bulk curing in 1962. 

Last year the U. S. Department of Agriculture released a 



report on the effect of using MH-30 as a desuckering agent. The 
report was not conclusive. However, it is generally conceded 
that a large percentage of the 1961 flue-cured crop was so 
treated. 

Probably the next move by growers will be to sell tobacco on 
the warehouse floors loose-leaf, or untied. During recent years 
there has been considerable interest shown by growers in the 
difference in prices paid for certain grades of tobacco sold tied 
on the North Carolina markets and sold untied on the Georgia 
markets. These differences, real or imagined, have encouraged 
the movement of considerable quantities of tobacco, especially 
in the early part of the season to be sold in Georgia. In fact, 
during the 1961 season over five and a half million pounds were 
sold in Georgia. 



I 




Growers have a large selection of disease resistant and old line non-resistant 
varieties from which to choose. 




Due to poor sorting by farmers, extra labor is used in hanging rooms to pluck 
off-grade leaves. 

Beside the price differential growers are interested in the time 
and labor saving aspects of selling untied tobacco. According to 
a study made by the U.S.D.A. it takes about 70 man hours per 
100 pounds to sort and tie tobacco. While if it is sold untied the 
time required to prepare 100 pounds for market takes only about 
two man-hours. If and when this practice is accepted on North 
Carolina markets, labor needed to market the crop in this state 
will be reduced in this proportion. 

As the use of mechanical harvesters and bulk curing increases, 
growers in North Carolina will become more interested in untied 
sales. So far the principal objections to selling untied tobacco 
has come from exporting companies. However, as the industry 
changes redrying and manufacturing techniques we could move 
gradually toward selling the entire crop untied. 

But in spite of all the advances in production, tobacco is still 
a crisis crop, controlled by the weather and the whims and fancies 
of the buyers. The domestic market situation is pretty well 
stabilized. Cigarettes manufactured in the United States during 
1961 reached 535 billion pieces and increases at the rate of three 
to four percent annually are expected in the future. In 1961 
domestic use of flue-cured probably reached 825 million pounds, 
or equal the 1951 usings which were the highest in flue-cured 
history. The total supply of flue-cured available going into 1962 
is slightly less than last year. By mid-1962 the supply level will 
probably be about the same as last year. With the allotted acre- 
age increased 4.3 percent and the yields per acre equal to the 



1959-61 average, a crop of 1,270 million pounds may be produced. 
If this is the situation the carry-over in mid-year will be the 
same as a year ago. Growers must look to cigarettes for in- 
creased uses of flue-cured as other products, such as smoking 
and chewing tobacco, using very little flue-cured show no increases 
or losses in amounts used. Smoking tobacco consumption has 
remained constant for about six years and with incomes of 
most customers holding at comparatively high levels, little change 
in smoking tobacco output is expected in 1962. 

Chewing tobacco, using some flue-cured, has been showing 
steady declines for several years. However, in 1961 consumption 
held at the same rate as in 1960. 

Therefore, growers expecting increased usings of flue-cured 
should be happy over the fact that cigarette consumption and 
output have set new record highs for the past five years. 

Although manufacturers have not advanced cigarette prices 
in the past five years, smokers are paying higher prices at the 
retail counter because of increased cigarette tax rates in many 
states. Several states began taxing cigarettes during this period. 

Beside the eight cent Federal tax, 47 states tax cigarettes at 
an average rate of five cents per pack, this is an increase of II/2 
cents per pack in the past five years. 

It is estimated that consumers spend 6.9 billion dollars a year 
for cigarettes and of this amount almost half, or 3.1 billion, goes 
to Federal, State and local governments. 

It appears that the consumption of cigarettes will continue to 
rise during the coming years, as our population expands and the 
income of the consumers remains at a high level. 

The future prospects of our export trade continue to be ham- 
pered by growing competition from countries expanding their 
flue-cured production. Rhodesia, Canada and India are our 
major competitors. Rhodesia's 1961 crop totaled 237 million 
pounds, the largest on record. This was accomplished principally 
by increasing yields per acre. The average yield per acre has 
now reached 1,042, an increase of more than 200 pounds per acre 
in the last two years. The average price per pound was 39.5 
cents. This price was .4 of a cent below the 1960 average. The 
United Kingdom purchased 110 million pounds in 1961, which 
was 10 million above a year ago. 

Canada's 1961 crop is estimated at 201 million pounds or two 
per cent less than the 1960 crop. Canadian markets opened for 
the sale of the 1961 crop on November 23 and through December 
had sold over 30 million pounds for an average price of 50.49 



cents per pound. Canada's exports of flue-cured during the first 
six months of 1961 were 35 million pounds, almost the total 
amount consigned to the United Kingdom. 

The 1961 flue-cured crop in India is estimated at 155 million 
pounds. Exports for the flrst six months were placed at 51 
million pounds with about 35 million pounds going to the United 
Kingdom. World consumption of cigarettes is increasing at 
about five per cent annually and is assisting these countries to 
increase their exports. North Carolina growers can expect 
tough sledding in its 1962 export trade. 

Foreign tobacco production during the past 10 years has been 
encouraged by the relatively high prices of North Carolina cig- 
arette leaf. For low and medium grades, especially, our prices 
are higher than for similar quality leaf in Rhodesia. Also ham- 
pering our export trade are mixing regulations which give wide 
advantages to local tobacco producers in several foreign coun- 
tries. 

Another important threat to flue-cured tobacco production 
comes from Western Europe. Traditionally we have exported 
about one-third of our production to European countries. Al- 
ready growers are feeling the squeeze of the European Common 
Market and are faced with far more drastic reductions unless 
present proposals are changed. 

The six nations presently comprising the European Common 
Market are France, Belgium, Italy, West Germany, the Nether- 
lands, and Luxemburg. Recently Greece was admitted as an 
associate member. 

The purpose of the Common Market will be to reduce tariff 
rates and other trade barriers for goods shipped to each other 
and establish among themselves uniform rates for all goods im- 
ported from outside countries. 

The agricultural policy for the Common Market countries is 
to be: Increasing productivity, raising living standards of the 
farm population, stabilizing markets, guaranteeing supplies and 
assuring reasonable prices to consumers. France, Italy and 
West Germany are already producers of tobacco. 

The export situation for flue-cured tobacco will become serious 
if the United Kingdom, which buys about 160 million pounds 
each year, joins the Common Market. Already provisions have 
been made for the British Commonwealth countries to be admit- 
ted. That means that Rhodesia and Canada, our strongest flue- 
cured competitors will benefit from import tax advantages. 

In a recent statement Congressman Harold D. Cooley said : 



"Tar Heel tobacco growers will have a decreasing share of an 
increasing market, if present proposals are carried through." 

The Government and Tobacco Associates are actively seeking 
to protect the interests of the tobacco farmer. Let us hope that 
their efforts will continue to be effective and tobacco will retain 
its proper place in the foreign markets. 

Otherwise the outlook for 1962 is the best growers have faced 
in the last ten years. The 1962 flue-cured crop will receive price 
support as required by law when marketing quotas are in effect. 
On December 12th, growers voted in referendum for continuation 
of marketing quotas for 1962, 1963 and 1964. Available data 
indicate that the 1962 price support will be 56.1 cents per pound, 
up half a cent from 1961. Allotted acreage will be 492,000 acres 
for North Carolina. 

Probably the best indication of the growers' favorable position 
is the fact that on January 1st the Flue-Cured Stabilization Cor- 
poration had on hand 375 million pounds under the price support 
program. This amount was 165 million pounds less than was 
held one year ago. 

During 1961 the Stabilization Corporation sold 233 million 
pounds of tobacco from old crop stocks, as compared to 74 mil- 
lion during the previous year. Interest of buyers in the old 
crops continues into this year and due to the fact that Stabiliza- 
tion received only a relatively small percentage (70 million 
pounds) from the 1961 crop, Stabilization's inventory is at its 
lowest level since 1954. 

The stage is set for the 1962 tobacco crop. Given favorable 
weather conditions growers will produce another record crop of 
the finest flue-cured tobacco produced in the world. The buyer 
demand should be strong on the auction warehouse floors this 
fall and from the economic standpoint 1962 should be another 
record breaking year for the North Carolina flue-cured tobacco. 



10 



Burley Outlook 1962 

North Carolina burley tobacco growers had another record 
breaking season in 1961. In spite of a six per cent acreage in- 
crease, buyer demand was strong throughout the season. Pro- 
duction was estimated at 20.6 million pounds with a 2,000 pound 
yield per acre. This would mean a record income to burley 
growers in Western North Carolina of $13.5 million dollars. 

The outlook for 1962 is tied in closely with the over all burley 
situation and prospects are good for the future. 

The total supply of burley is 1,675 million pounds, practically 
the same as a year ago. The 1961 crop of 548 million pounds is 
the largest since 1954 and reflects a six per cent acreage increase 
received last year. The total supply is equal to three years' 
usings. However, burley disappearance has exceeded total pro- 
duction for the last seven years and 1961 disappearance is ex- 
pected to reach 570 million pounds. 

The main outlet for burley is in the manufacture of cigarettes 
which are increasing at the rate of three to four per cent yearly. 
Considerable burley is used in smoking and plug tobacco and 
these products are expected to about hold at present levels. 

Burley exports were at 41 million pounds in 1961 and were 
the largest in the past 12 years. 

The government price support level in 1961 was 57.2 cents per 
pound. However loan rates for individual grades were increased 
by an average 0.7 cent a pound over 1960. The loan rates are set 
prior to the opening of the markets. If the price index continues 
to advance it is possible the price support level could be higher 
in 1962. 

The three burley cooperative associations had only 28 million 
pounds of tobacco held under the price support program on Jan- 
uary 1st. During 1961 over 50 million pounds were sold from the 
old stocks. 

The 1962 burley marketing quota and acreage allotments have 
been announced by the Secretary of Agriculture at 348,840 acres 
which includes another six per cent increase for this year. 

Early this year growers will vote in referendum on whether 
they favor the continuation of marketing quotas on the 1962, 
1963 and 1964 crops. At least two-thirds of the growers voting 
must approve if quotas are to continue in effect. 

11 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919-1961* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,341 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958 


429,000 


1,718 


736,855 


427,307 


58.00 


1959 


458,500 


1,533 


702,942 


407,055 


57.90 


1960 


457,500 


1,836 


839,870 


512,731 


61.10 


1961** 


463,000 


1,777 


822,695 


535,672 


65.10 



♦Source : N. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
♦♦Preliminary for 1961. 

12 



North Carolina Burley Crops 
1928-1961* 



Year 


No. Acres 


Yield Per 

Acre 
(Pounds) 


Production 
(1,000 lbs.) 


Value 
(1,000 Dollars) 


Average 
Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958 


9,300 


2,000 


18,600 


11,978 


64.40 


1959 


9,800 


2,060 


20,188 


11,426 


56.60 


1960 


9,500 


1,940 


18,430 


12,016 


65.20 


1961** 


10,600 


2,000 


21,200 


13,992 


66.00 



*Source : X. C. and USDA Crop Reporting Service. 
"♦Preliminary for 1961. 



13 



State Summary 1961-62 

The 1961-62 marketing season was highlighted by a record high market 
average and value, plus improved quality over the previous year. According 
to the U. S. Standards, a much larger percentage of the crop graded into the 
higher quality grades than has been the case in several years. 

North Carolina growers received $521,305,446 for the 800,041,265 pounds of 
tobacco sold on the 44 flue-cured markets during the 1961 season. This estab- 
lished a new record market average of $65.16 per hundred. In 1960 producer 
sales in North Carolina amounted to $500,109,487 from the sale of 817,386,008 
pounds of tobacco, which averaged $61.18 per hundred. The comparison of 
the two years shows that growers received $21,195,959 more in 1961 than in 
1960, while selling 17,344,744 pounds less tobacco than was sold in 1960. 
The record market average in 1961 was $3.98 per hundred higher than the 
previous record of 1960. 

The grade support prices for the 1961 crop of tied flue-cured tobacco aver- 
aged 92.4% of the 1959 frozen parity, and it was the first time since 1950 that 
the support level had reached 90% of parity as required by law. This boost 
in support was brought about by following closer to the legal requirements 
under the tobacco law, which made it necessary to change the method of 
determining the estimated grade distribution in a crop, and to add an average 
of 2.4 cents per pound to the grade support prices for 1961. The improvement 
in quality of the 1961 crop was another factor that helped boost the 1961 
support to the required level. 

Type 13 — -The markets in the Border Belt started the 1961 selling sea- 
son on August 3, which was about a week earlier than the August 11 opening 
of 1960. The quality of the crop was much better than the year before with a 
large increase in lemon colored offerings and a sharp decline in variegated 
tobacco. Average prices by grades were the highest on record with gains 
ranging from $1.00 to $6.00 per hundred. According to the market quotations, 
there were only two grades of tobacco that showed a decline in price from 
the previous year. They were B5FR and B6FR, the heavy side of leaf tobacco 
produced in the Border Belt. 

Growers sold 156,475,562 pounds of tobacco in the belt during the 1961 
marketing season, from which they received $102,935,842 giving them a record 
season average of $65.78 per hundred. In 1960 they sold 150,575,437 pounds 
for $93,648,182, averaging $62.13 per hundred. 

The support level for all tobacco offered in the Border Belt in 1961 averaged 
$58.79 per hundred, which was well above the average support level of 55.50 
for the 1961 crop year. 

Final sales were held in this belt on September 28 for a season of 40 sales 
days. In 1960 the season covered 46 days. 

Type 12 — The Eastern Belt opened for the 19 61 marketing season on 
August 22, one day earlier than the 1960 opening. The quality of offerings 
was considerably better than the year before in this belt, with a noticeable 
increase in the crop grading in the cutter grades. There was also more lemon 
and orange color tobacco and less red and variegated compared with the pre- 
vious year. About 83% of the grades showed grains ranging from $1.00 to 
$9.00 per hundred, with only one grade, B4GL, showing a decline in price. 

Farmers selling in this belt received a record high average price of $65.46 
per hundred for 386,055.705 pounds of tobacco, which gave them a cash return 
of $252,729,977. During the 1960 season growers received an average of $61.24 

14 



per hundred for 409,980,457 pounds, which returned them $251,077,871, or 
$1,642,106 less than was received from the 1961 sales. 

The support level for all tobacco sold in this belt averaged $57.69, which 
was well above the average support level for the 1961 crop. 

The Eastern Belt completed its 1961 marketing season on November 2, 
covering a period of 52 sale days, compared with 53 in 1960. 

Type IIB — The Middle Belt markets opened August .31, 19 61, which 
was about a week earlier than the September 6 opening of 1960. The volume 
of sales declined about 5% compared with the previous year, but the value of 
sales reached an all time high level. The slight increase in value was due 
mainly to improvement in quality plus increases in some grade prices rang- 
ing from $1.00 to $10.00 per hundred. There were eleven red, variegated, and 
immature grades that showed a decline in market average when compared 
with the 1960 averages. 

A record season average of $65.13 was obtained by growers who sold 146,- 
297;458 pounds in this belt during the 1961 season. They received a record of 
$95,283,770 from their sales. In 1960 producer sales averaged $61.61 for 
154,414,952 pounds, which amounted to a cash return of $95,128,920. 

The support level, as it was applied to all grades of tobacco offered for sale 
in this belt during the 1961 marketing season, averaged $57.50 per hundred. 

The Middle Belt marketing season closed out on November 16 after 55 sale 
days, compared with 53 days in 1960. 

Type llA — North Carolina Old Belt markets started 19 61 sales on Sep- 
tember 12, which was about a week earlier than the opening of 1960. The 
season was highlighted by record high prices and improved quality over the 
previous year. Approximately 80% of the grades showed gains ranging from 
$1.00 to $10.00 per hundred compared with 1960. There were only six grades 
in this belt that showed declines in price from the previous year and they 
were all immature grades, which emphasizes the importance of letting tobacco 
become thoroughly ripe before harvesting. 

Growers selling tobacco on North Carolina Old Belt markets obtained a 
record high season average of $63.26 for 111,212,540 pounds of tobacco, which 
gave them a cash return of $70,355,857. In 1960 growers received $60,254,514 
for 102,415,172 pounds of tobacco, which averaged $58.83 per hundred. 

The grade support levels for all tobacco sold in this belt during the 1961 
marketing season averaged $56.67, which was slightly better than 90% of 
parity. 

Final sales were held in this belt on December 8, covering a period of 62 
sale days as compared with 60 sale days in 1960. 

Type 31 — North Carolina Burley markets at Asheville, Boone and West 
Jefferson started the 1961-62 marketing season on November 27. The demand 
was strong for burley tobacco, and the quality was much improved over the 
previous year, due mainly to a good curing season. However, a large volume 
of tobacco was marketed too wet because of the warm humid fall in which 
many growers stripped tobacco when it was in too high case. 

Even with the wet tobacco, growers still set a new record average price, of 
$65.98 for 19,558,348 pounds sold during the 1961-62 season. The value of 
these sales amounted to $12,904,498. During the 1960-61 marketing season 
growers received $10,260,172 from the sale of 15.724,586 pounds of tobacco, 
which averaged $65.25. Less than one per cent of the sales went into the 
burley pool under government loan. 

Final sales were held at Asheville on January 10, and at Boone and West 
Jefferson on January 11, covering a period of 23 sale days. The 1960-61 
season covered 25 sale days. • .. _ 









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Summary of N.C. Dealer and Warehouse 
Resales — 1961 -62 

Percentage 
Belt Pounds Dollars Resales 

Border Belt 

Dealers 3,885,026 

Warehouse 9,215,306 

Eastern Belt 

Dealer 7,508,032 

Warehouse 20,910,481 

Middle Belt 

Dealer 4,704,896 

Warehouse 11,287,097 

Old Belt 

Dealer 3,715,054 

Warehouse 10,853,388 

Burley Belt 

Dealer 325,074 

Warehouse 2,500,112 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue Cured 
Tobacco by States — 1961 



2,009,574 
5,590,250 


2.3 

5.4 


4,010,906 
2,376,702 


1.8 
5.0 


2,359,011 

6,986,942 


2.9 
7.0 


896,632 
3,826,460 


3.0 

8.6 


203,911 
1,621,884 


1.5 
7.2 







Producer 


Sales 


Gross 


Sales 




State 


Pounds 


Average Price 


Pounds 


Average Price 


N. C. . 

Va 

S. C 

Ga 

Fla. 




800,041,264 

135,442,969 

136,836,555 

155,154,750 

. 22,642,775 


65.16 
63.38 
66.20 
59.10 
60.68 

64.25 


873,562,709 
145,821,566 
154,972,822 
165,836,054 
25,257,371 




64.61 
62.99 
65.61 
58.87 
60.34 




Total 


1,250,118,313 






1,365,450,522 


63.75 



Stabilization Receipts by Belts — 1961 



Belt 


Type 


Producers 
Sales (lbs.) 


Stabilization 
Receipts (lbs.) 


Percentage 
Stab. Received 


Old Belt 

Middle Belt 

Eastern Belt 

Border Belt 

Ga.-Fla. Belt 


IIA 

IIB 

12 - 

13 

14 


246,655,508 
146,297,458 
386,055,705 
293,312,137 
177,797,525 


17,418,828 
6,157,568 

31,338,798 
8,239,342 
7,162,498 

70,317,034 




7.06 
4.20 
8.12 
2.81 
4.03 


Total 


11-14 


1,250,118,313 


5.62 



18 



Flue Cured Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 





N. C. Tobacco 


Sold Out of State 


Out of State Tobacco 


Sold in N. C. 


state 


1961 (Pour 


ds) 


I960 


1961 (Pound 


s) I960 


Va 


34,801,549 




32,787,230 

9,094,442 

4,771,895 

1,392 


9,250,920 
13,759,925 


10,701,603 


S. C 

Ga. 


12,074,637 

.5,861,080 


14,070,877 


Fla 


120,893 






Ala. 




1,228 








23,010,845 




Total 


52,858,959 


46,654,959 


24,773,708 



Burley Tobacco Movement In and Out of 
North Carolina 





N. C. Tobacco 


Sold Out of State 


Out of State Tob 


acco Sold In N. C. 


State 


1961 (Poun 


ds) 


I960 


1961 (P 


aunds) I960 


Teiin 


5,142,266 




4,990,582 
6,896 


1,566,124 

1,957,257 

28,612 


1,204,362 


Va 




1,415,983 


W. Va 




17,574 


Ky. . 




8,151 




Ga 




46,090 
2,012 


23,568 


S. C. 






1,938 










Total 


5,142,260 


5,005,629 


3,600,095 


2,663 425 









19 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotmenl's'^ 

1962 

Acreage 
County No. Farms Allotment Raiik 

Alamance - - 1,433 

Alexander 968 

Anson -- 273 

Beaufort 2,455 

Bertie 1,755 

Bladen 3,312 

Brunswick 1,765 

Budke 1 

Cabarrus -. 1 

Caldwell ..- 260 

Camden 2 

Carteret 417 

Caswell 1,948 

Catawba 4 

Chatham 1,100 

Chowan — 194 

Cleveland — 1 

Columbus _._. 5,065 

Craven _ 1,820 

Cumberland 2,427 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1,853 

Davie ._ 814 

Duplin — 4,455 

Durham 1,022 

Edgecombe — ..__ 1,610 

Forsyth _ 2,279 

Franklin 2,754 

Gaston _____ 1 

Gates ____ 127 

Granville 2,131 

Greene 1,248 

Guilford 3,235 

Halifax ____ 2,206 

Harnett ___ 3,706 

Hertford 993 

Hoke _ _.:: 861 

Iredell 820 

Johnston 5,452 

Jones _ 925 

Lee 1,321 

20 



4,906.76 


37 


1,452.05 


50 


411.37 


61 


9,937.86 


21 


5,903.12 


32 


7,745.37 


28 


3,433.95 


41 


.61 


69 


.03 


73 


498.72 


59 


4.86 


66 


1,400.13 


51 


9,542.34 


2-3 


5.53 


65 


3,080.99 


46 


567.02 


58 


.37 


71 


17,127.68 


7 


8,868.45 


24 


5,492.41 


34 


.07 


72 


3,410.25 


44 


1,224.28 


53 


16,142.70 


8 


3,986.63 


39 


11,974.97 


16 


5,142.38 


35 


11,886.99 


18 


4.79 


67 


280.57 


62 


13,862'.30 


13 


12,451.97 


15 


9,557.12 


22 


6,134.30 


31 


15,043.75 


11 


3,394.26 


45 


2,663.34 


47 


1,275.47 


52 


23,664.94 


2 


5,641.27 


33 


4,2-84.99 


38 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments* 
1962 (continued) 

Acreage 
County No. Farms Allotment Rank 

Lenoir _-. 1,885 

Martin 1,561 

Mecklenburg 1 

Montgomery 424 

Moore 1,650 

Nash 2,974 

New Hanover 89 

Northampton 221 

Onslow 1,889 

Orange 950 

Pamlico 418 

Pender 1,686 

Person 1,753 

Pitt 2,685 

Randolph 1,622 

Richmond 1,011 

Robeson — 4,839 

Rockingham 3,030 

Rowan 38 

Sampson 5,355 

Scotland 542 

Stokes 2,755 

Surry 3,169 

Tyrrell 2 

Vance 1,490 

Wake 3,846 

Warren 1,965 

Washington 295 

Wayne 3,064 

Wilkes 967 

Wilson 2,118 

Wadkin 2,687 

State Total 119,996 

*Source : USDA Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation. 



14,497.62 


12 


8,835.09 


25 


.52 


70 


1,005.78 


56 


5,091.62 


36 


18,853.86 


5 


225.63 


63 


492.12 


60 


6,493.17 


29 


3,458.47 


40 


1,143.59 


55 


3,414.01 


43 


10,026.95 


20 


26,289.69 


1 


3,432-.66 


42 


2,177.14 


48 


21,520.26 


3 


13,577.22 


14 


48.58 


64 


15,879.48 


9 


1,202.75 


54 


11,914.54 


17 


11,374.95 


19 


1.98 


68 


8,491.12 


26 


20,158.22 


4 


6,352.02- 


30 


999.14 


57 


15,141.58 


10 


1,610.31 


49 


17,489.37 


6 


8,381.99 


27 


491,990.33 


1-73 



21 



N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments' 

1962 



Acreage 
County No. Farms Allotment Rank 

Alleghany 499 

Ashe 2,451 

Avery — . 243 

Brunswick — _ 1 

Buncombe .__. 3,065 

Burke — - -- 11 

Caldwell -.. 24 

Catawba 4 

Cherokee 185 

Clay .__ --. -... 199 

Cleveland 9 

Davidson 3 

Gaston 1 

Graham ._. 715 

Granville - 1 

Haywood .__- 2,040 

Henderson _ 118 

Iredell 4 

Jackson 315 

Lincoln ___. 2 

McDowell 85 

Macon ____ 228 

Madison _._. 2,970 

Mitchell 948 

Polk 6 

Randolph 1 

Rutherford .._. 66 

Stokes __.. 2 

Surry 8 

Swain 225 

Transylvania 70 

Watauga 1,619 

Wilkes 24 

Yadkin 1 

Yancey 1,879 

State Total 18,022 

♦Source : USDA Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation. 



22 



247.82 


9 


1,258.00 


5 


128.09 


11 


0.11 


35 


1,854.80 


2 


4.83 


21 


11.20 


20 


1.57 


26 


74.04 


15 


92.87 


12 


3.25 


23 


1.54 


27 


0.75 


29 


388.12 


8 


0.11 


34 


1,286.40 


3 


52.23 


16 


1.91 


24 


137.16 


10 


0.34 


32 


30.78 


19 


79.42 


14 


2,895.70 


1 


581.96 


7 


1.69 


25 


0.68 


30 


33.96 


18 


0.34 


32 


1.00 


28 


79.87 


13 


36.72 


17 


904.54 


6 


4.16 


22 


0.11 


33 


1,285.85 


4 


11,482.52 


1-35 



USDA's Tobacco Inspection Service 

Who is the most important man on the auction sales floor? 
Some farmers say the warehouseman who owns the facility, fur- 
nishes the sales force to place tobacco on the floor, pay off the 
sales and start the auction by putting the first bid on a pile being- 
sold. Others contend the buyer who puts the final bid on the 
tobacco and whose company pays the bill for all purchases. 

How about the third man, the USDA's tobacco inspector? His 
responsibility to the grower is probably as important as either 
of the other two and his judgment has a profound effect on the 
check the grower receives at the pay off window. 

The inspector is a highly trained specialist with a background 
in tobacco judging, who has taken training courses and passed 
tests to qualify for this work. The inspector precedes the auction 
sale and certifies each basket as to grade, according to Federal 
standards. This grade is, in reality, a description of each basket 
of tobacco as to group, quality and color. 

The grade placed on the warehouse ticket on each pile of flue- 
cured tobacco establishes the support price at which the Govern- 
ment agrees to accept the tobacco under the price support pro- 
gram, provided the grower is a within quota producer. 

At present there are 171 grades on the flue-cured price support 
schedule of supported grades. The Federal system of grades 
differs from company grades since it must describe all lots of 
tobacco offered for sale. Therefore, how can the farmer get full 
advantage of the services provided by the grading service ? 

Having produced a crop of tobacco, the grower is still faced 
with the problem of selling it for the best possible prices. First, 
he needs to prepare his tobacco for market so that it meets the 
requirements of prospective buyers. It is also helpful that the 
grower understand the U. S. Standard grades which are easily 
interpreted with a little instruction in their application. When 
a lot of tobacco is sold at auction, many factors other than type 
and quality may influence the selling price. As a result, it is not 
unusual to see parts of a split lot sold at different prices. Nor is 
it uncommon for selling prices of tobacco of the same quality and 
other identical characteristics to vary considerably among dif- 

23 



ferent auction markets. The price variations are, to a large 
extent, inherent in the system of auction selling. 

For many years prior to the organization of the Flue-Cured 
Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization Corporation in 1946, tobacco 
inspection was available on only a few markets in the flue-cured 
area. However, in 1941 the Government, through its lending 
agencies, offered non-recourse loans on tobacco when marketing 
quotas have been approved by growers. The loans on flue-cured 
are administered through the Flue-Cured Stabilization Corpora- 
tion. This organization places a support price on each basket of 
growers' tobacco that is in sound and merchantable condition. 

The U. S. Standard grade, recorded by the Government in- 
spector on the warehouse ticket, establishes the rate of loan for 
the basket. The grower then, by referring to the schedule of 
loan rates by grades, can quickly determine the loan rate per 
pound for the basket. He need not take less than this price if 
he is otherwise eligible to participate in the price support pro- 
gram. 

The Federal inspection service was authorized in The Tobacco 
Inspection Act of 1935. The Federal inspection, demonstration. 




Federal tobacco grader inspecting pile of tobacco and farmer checking price 
support list to determine advance price. 



24 



and market news services of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
which are based on Government standard grades, provide an 
impartial and unbiased measuring stick of grades and prices 
which each grower can use. 

This is how the loan program works. When marketing quotas 
are in effect the price support level is 90 per cent of 1959 frozen 
parity price, which for the 1961 crop was $55.5 per hundred 
pounds. The market value of a lot of flue-cured tobacco is de- 
termined largely by its grade. In effect, each buyer makes a 
grade determination according to his own particular standards 
before he decides how much to bid on a lot of tobacco. To make 
sure that price support is available for all sound tobacco loan 
rates are established on a grade basis by use of U. S. Standard 
grades. 

The rates for the various grades are established in such a 
manner that the average for the total annual production is 
equal to the price support level, or 90 per cent of parity. 

The average farmer cannot spend enough time on the ware- 
house floor to keep posted on the value of the different grades of 
tobacco. The market news service gathers information on aver- 
age prices by grade as a companion service to the inspection 
service. The tobacco market price reports are placed at con- 
venient locations in the auction warehouse. 

The value of the inspection and market news services lies in 
the fact that the certificate of grade on the warehouse ticket and 
the price reports furnish a definite basis for making an intelli- 
gent decision on whether or not to accept a bid. 



25 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses 
and Operators By Belts and Markets 

BORDER BELT 

Cliadboiii'ii (one set buyers) 

Producers — Jack W. Garrett, J. Franklin Bullard 
Green-Teachey — Charlie Teachey, J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf— J. M. Bryant, B. F. Rivenbark, H. G. Perry 
New Clarkton Whse. — Talley Bros. & Sons 

Fair Bluflf (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell & Sons 
Planters-Littleton's — Ray Haney 

Fairmont (4 sets buyers) 

People's Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Davis & Mitchell Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Holliday-Frye — E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — G. R. Royster, Daniel 

Square Deal 1-2-3— W. C. Bassett 

Star Carolina 1-2-3— W. M. Puckett 

Liberty-Twin State— P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson, F. P. Joyce, Joe Pell 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2 — P. L. Campbell 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Liimberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Townsend 
Smith-Dixie — Furman Biggs, Sr. & Jr. 
Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina & New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutuchfield 

Lea's Big Dixie — William Townes Lea, Louie Love 

Moore's — A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 

Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 

Planters No. 1 & 2— A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 

Gray-Neal Farmers-Colum_bus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Liberty — J. W. Hooks, I. A. Barefoot & Sons 

Smith — Ernest Smith, Paul Jeffreys 

26 



EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. M. Odom, Pierce & Winborne 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers — H. A. Carr. J. A. Chestnut, J. J. Hill 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse — Tom Smothers, Jack Calhoun 
Planters — Leland Lee, J. M. Smothers 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 
Bell's — Bell Brothers 

Farmers & Monks — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Planters & Prewits — Chester Worthington, W. A. Newell, B. S. Correll 

C. Prewit 
Lee's — Gordon Lee, Carl Rowan 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith 

Farmers No. 1— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Farmers No. 2— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Victory — Richard Gray, Clarence Whitley 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Star-Planters — Harding Suggs, B. B. Suggs, L. T. Hill 

McGowan's — J. A. Worthington, Jack Moye 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Lee Paramore, Laddie Avery 

New Independent — Bob Cullipher, F. L. Blount 

"Victory — Harold Forbes, G. B. Jones 

Raynor-Forbes — Noah Raynor, A. H. Forbes 

Keel's — Ashley Wynne, Floyd McGowan 

Harris & Rogers — R. E. Rogers 

Kinston (four sets buyers) 
Central — W. I. Herring 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins 
Kinston Cooperative — S. W. Smith 
Knott's New — H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. ■ 

Sheppard No. 1 & 2— J. T. Sheppard 
New Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 
The Star Warehouse No. 1 — C. J. Herring 
The Star Warehouse No. 2 — C. J. Herring 
Banner — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 



27 



Robersonville (one set buyers) 
Adkins & Bailey — R. K. Adkins 

Gray & Gray- (Red Front) — J. H. Gray, Jack Sharpe 
Planters No. 1 & 2— H. T. Highsmlth, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, J. C. Carlton 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3 — W. H. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2 — James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. C. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters — J. B. Wooten, Mrs. W. A. Carter 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — Joe & C. E. Stephenson 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Wallace No. 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Skinner's — Frank Skinner 

Tai"l)oro (one set buyers) 

Clark's No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3 — Joe Bryant, Bill Hussey 
Sheffield's— John Sheffield 

Washington (one set buyers) 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson 
Talley-Hassell 1 & 2— M. M. Hassell, W. G. Talley 

Wendell (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Tripp Bros., Morris Tripp 

Liberty 1 & 2— H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin, J. W. Dale 

Northside — G. Dean 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3 — Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc. — H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 

28 



Williamstoii (one set buyers) 

Farmers — John A. Griffin, Leman Barnhill 
Rodgers Warehouse — Urbin Rogers, Russell Rogers 
New Dixie — Jim Pierce, Fisher Harris 

Wiiidsor (one set buyers) 

Planters 1 & 2— C. B. & B. U. Griffin 
Heckstall — Max Hux, Julian Heckstall 
Spruills— H. B. Spruill 

MIDDLE IJELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — George Mabe, Tom Faulkner 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — G. Hoover Carter 
Victory — Earl Ennis & Buck Layton 

Durham (three sets buyers) 
Liberty — John Walker Stone 

Roycroft— H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 
Star-Brick — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 
Farmers — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

EUerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — R. P. Brim & S. H. Richardson 
Richmond County — Bud Rummage & Roy Smith 

Fuqviay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Big Top — Bill Talley & E. E. Clayton 
New Deal— W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Central — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Goldleaf— Sherrill Akins & J. W. Dail 
Liberty — P. L. Campbell 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banner— E. C. Huff, L. H. Wilkinson 

Carolina — M. L. High 

Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 

Farmers — W. J. Alston, Jr. 

High Price — C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner 

Liberty — George T. Robertson 

Ellington — F. H. Ellington & Sons 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklkin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. H. Cottrell 

Southside A & B— Charlie Ford 

Friendly Four — L. L. Sturdivant, James Speed 



29 



Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner — W. L. Mitchell, Jr., David Mitchell 
Mangum-Farmers — T. B. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott 
Fleming No. 1 & 2— G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin 
Planters & Johnson — C. R. Watkins, C. R. Watkins, Jr. 
Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 
Granville — L. S. Bryan, Jr., W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2— W. F. Wood 
Twin City 1 & 2— W. M. Carter, T. V. Mansfield 
King Roberts 1-2-3— King Roberts 
Castleberrys — C. N. Castleberrys 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boydd's— W. P. Burwell 
Centre No. 1 & 2— M. D. Carroll 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 
Currin's 1 & 2— C. W. Currin 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Harold Perkins, Burch Keck 
Coble — N. C. Newman, Curry King 
Farmers — Bill & Jack McCauley 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 

Guilford County Tobacco Warehouse Co. — H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Carolina— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Sharpe & Smith— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers — W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers 1 & 2 — Joe Dillard, Jule Allen 

New Piedmont — A. O. Kingg, Jr., Billy Hopkins, Hugh Strayhorn 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

Dixie 1 & 2— J. W. & J. L. Hunter 

New Farmers — Tom Jones, Buck White, O. L. Badgett, F. V. Dearmin 

Hunters — J. W., J. L. Hunter 

ReidsAalle (one set buyers) 

Farmers— C. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader-Watts — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers— T. B. & J. M. Smothers 
Browns — C. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael 



30 



Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 
Hyco — W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, George Walker 
Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., Pres. 
Planters No. 2— T. O. Pass 
Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 
Pioneer— J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Joyce's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Joyce, Willis Wake 
Farmers — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorefield 
Piedmont — J. J. Webster 
Powell — Elmer Powell, Francis Brown 

Winstoii-Salein (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina-Star — G. H. Robertson, H. M. Bouldin 
Growers— Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 
Pepper No. 1 & 2 — Fred Owens, F. L. Kellam 
Taylor — Paul Taylor 
Big Winston— R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, William Fowler, H. A. 
Thomas 

N. C. BUKLEV BELT 

Aslieville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Burley-Dixie No. 1 & 2— L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart 
Bernard-Walker Warehouse — James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — Joe E. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Farmers Burley — Tom Faulkner, Hoover Carter 



31 



DOMESTIC CIGARETTE CONSUMPTION 
BY KINDS-1961 




Total Domestic ConsTimptlon 
495 Billion Cigarettes 



INSECTICIDE REPORT 

/ft* f96f 




THEBULLETIN 
of the 
North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
Number 168 May, 1962